Author Topic: Taxi driver linked to drugging and assaulting 100 victims to be released  (Read 818 times)

Offline Trifle

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Thanks Betty. I saw the news yesterday and was wondering what you would think about it.

ETA: I have read your post properly now, very interesting. What I noticed about the reporting of this in the media, although I havenít had a chance to read the press reports in detail, is the repeated  mentioning of the fact a Ďvery experiencedí woman on the parole board was heavily involved in the decision to release him. Iíd be interested to hear more about her decision making process and why the other allegations werenít taken into account; I find that omission surprising, as you said. Anyway thanks again - I find all the law stuff fascinating. Some of what you highlight, i.e the resignation of the head of the parole board,  sounds like yet another illogical absurdity of which there seems lately to be an ever increasing number of in relation to important decision making for the country, and on a smaller level such as the bizarreness of a man marrying a woman being celebrated in the lgbt press. It just feels like things are getting more and more nuts in general.
« Last Edit: Mar 29, 2018, 11:46:14 AM by Trifle »

Offline Betty Croker's frosted buns

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I haven't said much about the victims there but basically, it s politicians failing to spend money that have led to the extra grief suffered by them.

Someone from the prosecution at the beginning of the case has told them when they were forming a queue to give evidence against him, that they needn't bother because they have enough on him and he's never coming out. So they didn't invest huge resources in prosecuting so many cases. And that would be largely because the Courts and the CPS and Police are running on a shoe string and the system is at the point of collapse.

Then the Judge has been bound by the actual convictions when setting sentence and sentenced him to a tariff within those guidelines. If he hadn't the sentence could have been appealed by Warboys.

Then his tariff has ended. He has become entitled for Parole and a Parole Board release him despite the "he's never getting out" complacency of the CPS/police prosecution team.

The Secretary of State has no right to overturn a Parole Board decision to release so the Courts come to the rescue and tell the Parole Board to go back and re-make their decision but this time effectively treat him as being convicted of all the cases he wasn't prosecuted for. They don't word it as strongly as that because they can't but its essentially what is happening.

So save hundreds of thousands of pounds prosecuting cases by just giving the Parole Board a wink and a nudge to act as if they were convicted anyway.

Which is all well and good while it happens with a Public Enemy Number 1. Not so good when it drips down through the Justice System.

And its no criticism of the victims as its important to them to get the right result however the various, confusing elements of the Criminal Justice System interact to get there.

But as for the Major of London's unnecessary political involvement, we might as well just ask him to stand in Parliament Square giving the thumbs up or the thumbs down to any Parole applicant with a clapometer to record the weight of public opinion.

Its active, popular democracy but it isn't the Rule of Law. 
« Last Edit: Mar 29, 2018, 11:40:29 AM by Betty Croker's frosted buns »
And now I know how Joan of Arc felt.......

Offline Trifle

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^ ^ I edited that post before I saw this.

^ Thatís interesting as well and really concerning for the implications of this case for other future cases. It doesnít surprise me to hear money may be a contributory factor to the behind the scenes mismanagement and confusion as usual which is then selectively reported and manipulated for other agendas. Is anything ever as it seems?!

Offline Betty Croker's frosted buns

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Thanks Betty. I saw the news yesterday and was wondering what you would think about it.

ETA: I have read your post properly now, very interesting. What I noticed about the reporting of this in the media, although I havenít had a chance to read the press reports in detail, is the repeated  mentioning of the fact a Ďvery experiencedí woman on the parole board was heavily involved in the decision to release him. Iíd be interested to hear more about her decision making process and why the other allegations werenít taken into account; I find that omission surprising, as you said. Anyway thanks again - I find all the law stuff fascinating. Some of what you highlight, i.e the resignation of the head of the parole board,  sounds like yet another illogical absurdity of which there seems lately to be an ever increasing number of in relation to important decision making for the country, and on a smaller level such as the bizarreness of a man marrying a woman being celebrated in the lgbt press. It just feels like things are getting more and more nuts in general.

It does, doesn't it?

There are always more women at a Parole hearing than men. Most probation officers who give evidence at Parole Hearings are women. The prison service psychologists are almost, exclusively, women. A big proportion of the prison service staff who give evidence are women as are maybe most of the legal representatives.

Its not unusual for the offender to be the only male at his Parole Hearing. Some male offenders worry about that and worry about bias but even with sexual offences they don't need to because I would say the standard of decision-making is actually higher than the average Court or Tribunal. Not so many egos jostling for prime place to get in the way - although there can be a bit of that - just not as much.

I've heard there was a female independent psychologist involved as a witness as well as an extremely experienced Parole Board Chair who was female. One of the things that irked me in the reports of the decision was that the Court weren't happy that the Chair wasn't a Judicial member of the Parole Board. In other words, not a Judge or a former Judge. I don't know how much of that is simply judicial conceit - they are Judges therefore they think that anyone who isn't a Judge can't make decisions as well as they can. There are members of the Parole Board who are Judges or former Judges and they don't make any better or worse Chairs or better or worse decisions than any other Chair. The only real point to having a Judge as Chair as far as I can see, is in case matters of law come up but did this case really turn on an error of law? I'm not sure that was what was really at the bottom of it, at all.

I put it this way, if they had to give weight to the other allegations against him, then there would have had to have been sufficient information in the dossier prepared for them by the Secretary of State for them to be able to make an informed decision about how much weight to give them. If he denied some or all of the other allegations then his leg rep would have to be able to respond to them and have evidence added to the dossier to rebut the idea that they accurately reflected his offending. Did that happen? It's unlikely that they said they would simply ignore anything about the other allegations that was in the dossier. Its more likely that they considered that they were entitled to reach a decision on the information placed before them, information that came largely if not entirely from the Secretary of State's Department and didn't include heavily detailed material regarding the unconvicted allegations. Its important to remember that the reviewing Court didn't reconvene its own Parole Hearing and come to its own view about whether Warboys should be released. They simply told the Parole Board to reconvene and make a fresh assessment of his risks taking into account more information.
« Last Edit: Mar 29, 2018, 01:33:37 PM by Betty Croker's frosted buns »
And now I know how Joan of Arc felt.......

Offline Trifle

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Ok, I didnít realise most people at parole hearings are women. I imagine it must be a very frustrating area to work in at times.

It sounds like a fair bit of scapegoating has been going on and typical central government shenanigans.

Offline Top

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Cheers, Betty, that was really enlightening.

The thought of keeping anyone locked up for allegations is more terrifying to me than having another rapist on the streets.
I'm reporting you to the mods for annoying me to the point where I become ill and have to take tranquillisers.  - Wolfie