Author Topic: Music which makes you cry (or almost)  (Read 3438 times)

Offline Artist

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Re: Music which makes you cry (or almost)
« Reply #15 on: May 06, 2017, 12:57:53 AM »
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=otuwNwsqHmQ
Labi Siffre - Something Inside So Strong


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYgMkFk8V78
Rock Choir - Something Inside So Strong (Live at Wembley Arena)
« Last Edit: May 06, 2017, 01:17:23 AM by Artist »
“Expectations are resentments under construction.”
― Anne Lamott

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Re: Music which makes you cry (or almost)
« Reply #16 on: May 06, 2017, 01:10:00 AM »

Offline Musette

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Re: Music which makes you cry (or almost)
« Reply #17 on: May 06, 2017, 01:22:25 AM »
Musette, would you be willing to say more about your fear of singing and how you got over it?

I have always 'known'  that I am a dreadful singer, which was confirmed by a publicly humiliating announcement in front of the whole class by my primary school teacher when I was about 7.

One of my kids, who is very musical (which he shares with his stepmother and must get from his donor) has tried persuading me that my singing is actually just normal and not horribly bad, and that I can sing. This makes me cry, but I am not yet convinced or brave enough to take lessons...

Yes, happy to, LfL, even if only because it might help someone else :)

I always 'knew' I couldn't sing. I knew it in the same way I knew I couldn't fly like a bird.
When I was 4 years old I was, along with many other children rejected for the school choir (we had to stand up one at a time and sing Happy Birthday, then the 'music' teacher sent us to one side of the hall or the other. Depending on where you were sent you were in the choir or not - it was a very public humiliation).
As I got older I never sang if I thought anyone could hear me then one day when I was about 15 I was singing for my own pleasure and my brother overheard me. He has perfect pitch and told me that I was singing flat. That just confirmed my knowledge that I couldn't sing and I never sang again until I had my first baby at 34.
Then I would sing to him (and later his sibling) whenever I felt like it, and always at bedtime. I built up quite a repertoire (all sorts from nursery rhymes to folk songs to musical theatre numbers). We had a little bedtime ritual where I would sing 3 songs once they were in bed. When they were old enough they would request whatever songs they wanted. But I could still only do it as long as I knew 100% that nobody but them could hear me -not my neighbours, not their dad, not my mum (who has always sung in choirs). I guess I thought my kids wouldn't judge me, or that they didn't know any better to realise what a terrible singer I was.
Anyway, inevitably, their dad sometimes overheard me. He is very musical and insisted that I had a good voice. I didn't believe him, obviously, but eventually he persuaded me to do something to get over my belief that I couldn't sing. It's not as though not being able to sing is the end of the world, I know, but for me it was a great sadness.
So, at the age of 40 I signed up for a class at my local Adult Ed centre: Singing workshop for beginners.
Two hours every week on a Tuesday afternoon, I went along to a class with about a dozen other people who all told similar stories to mine. The idea of the class was that we would do a group warm up and then each student would get a bit of time to work on their chosen song, in front of the rest of the class. Ultimately the aim was to put on a concert at the end of the year where we would each perform to an invited audience.
It was my idea of hell and for the first term and a half, every time it was my turn I'd stand in front of the class unable to make a sound, and eventually sit down again. The teacher was very patient but I began to think I'd never be able to do it.
But slowly I gained a bit of confidence and once I was able to produce a noise the teacher told me that my material (pop songs really - Simon & Garfunkel, that sort of thing) was wrong for my voice and she persuaded me to try classical. So she started to teach me how to produce my soprano voice, which I'd never done before. It was a revelation.
I had to choose something to perform so, going for broke, I picked O Mio Babbino Caro, as mentioned.
I sang it in the class, I sang it in my car, I sang it in the shower but I still couldn't do it in front of anyone else.
But somehow, at the end of the summer term, I did it. I stood on the stage and sang, with a piano accompaniment, to a room full of people (some strangers and some I knew). It was terrifying but liberating.
I kept going to the class for about 3 years and sang all sorts including Mozart, Handel, Schubert, Vivaldi and Bizet.

One Xmas about 10 years ago a friend of mine asked if I'd like to go and see her choir performing locally, so I went along and loved it. I joined up on the spot.
I now sing in two a capella choirs and love performing. I haven't done any solo singing for a long time but sometimes we do small group work and I enjoy that. I'd have to be extremely drunk to do anything like karaoke though! I don't have the best voice in the world but I can sing in tune and I can hold a harmony; I have a good sense of rhythm and am good at learning songs.
My singing is very important to me now. My choir rehearsals are sacrosanct. Singing is incredibly good for you - physically and mentally. And singing with other people is such a visceral, emotional experience; creating harmonies and literally tuning in to the people around you - it's so powerful and uplifting. The word most often used by my choirmates to describe the experience of singing together is 'joyful', which has got to be a good thing. I'm only sorry it took me so long to find out.

TL/DR: I was told I couldn't sing at a very early age and believed it for 30 years. Having kids made me do something about it and I haven't looked back!



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=otuwNwsqHmQ
Labi Siffre - Something Inside So Strong

My larger choir (about 40 people) does a version of this. It's wonderful to sing :)
Indeed, here we are performing it last month:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzZpDOBkPoU
"U r a multifaceted dark horse. Oh yes you are..."

a wise and helpful soul, Musette  ;D

Offline Artist

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Re: Music which makes you cry (or almost)
« Reply #18 on: May 06, 2017, 01:42:43 AM »
Your choir performance is so beautiful.
Your story is so inspirational. I couldn't stop reading it.
“Expectations are resentments under construction.”
― Anne Lamott

Offline Musette

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Re: Music which makes you cry (or almost)
« Reply #19 on: May 06, 2017, 01:56:41 AM »
Artist, thank you, that's very kind :)
And thank you for reading the whole post - I realise it's a bit long ;)
But taking up singing is one of the best things I ever did - I recommend it to everyone!

"U r a multifaceted dark horse. Oh yes you are..."

a wise and helpful soul, Musette  ;D

Offline scouser

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Re: Music which makes you cry (or almost)
« Reply #20 on: May 06, 2017, 01:48:29 PM »
Classical
One day I'll laugh about this!😑

Offline Musette

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Re: Music which makes you cry (or almost)
« Reply #21 on: May 06, 2017, 02:16:45 PM »
^ what, all of it..?!
"U r a multifaceted dark horse. Oh yes you are..."

a wise and helpful soul, Musette  ;D

Offline scouser

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Re: Music which makes you cry (or almost)
« Reply #22 on: May 06, 2017, 02:19:39 PM »
No.
One day I'll laugh about this!😑

Offline Musette

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Re: Music which makes you cry (or almost)
« Reply #23 on: May 06, 2017, 07:41:17 PM »
Ok then. Thanks for your contribution.
"U r a multifaceted dark horse. Oh yes you are..."

a wise and helpful soul, Musette  ;D

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Re: Music which makes you cry (or almost)
« Reply #24 on: May 06, 2017, 09:05:11 PM »
Artist, thank you, that's very kind :)
And thank you for reading the whole post - I realise it's a bit long ;)
But taking up singing is one of the best things I ever did - I recommend it to everyone!

Only if you have a decent singing voice which I do not.   
Music isn't my hobby, it's my passion.

Offline Lust for Life

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Re: Music which makes you cry (or almost)
« Reply #25 on: May 06, 2017, 09:58:41 PM »
I don't know, c&m, there's something very sad about a whole group having similar stories, also similar to mine.... Musette went from being a bad singer to singing in a choir (sorry for calling you that, Musette, but I am referring to you describing yourself as not being able to sing).

I wonder how bad we are at singing or if it's learnable?

Your story made me cry, Musette, thank you so much for sharing it.

Offline Earl

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Re: Music which makes you cry (or almost)
« Reply #26 on: May 06, 2017, 10:13:05 PM »
I'm not a particular fan of 'O....Caro', but that you sing it Musette, is incredibly impressive. And Even the idea of gathering up and singing 'protest songs' is fab.i stumbled across a French one (from a film) a while back. Sadly, can't for the life of me remember the title or even how it went.
Nye Bevan, 'the NHS will exist for only as long as the people fight for it'...or something like that.

Offline Earl

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Re: Music which makes you cry (or almost)
« Reply #27 on: May 06, 2017, 10:18:46 PM »
I don't know, c&m, there's something very sad about a whole group having similar stories, also similar to mine.... Musette went from being a bad singer to singing in a choir (sorry for calling you that, Musette, but I am referring to you describing yourself as not being able to sing).

I wonder how bad we are at singing or if it's learnable?

Your story made me cry, Musette, thank you so much for sharing it.

This puts me in mind of the 11+ and grammar schools. That children are not just on the end of off-the-cuff remarks about not being good enough, but are officially 'not good enough', is crushing, disabling and cruel. And mostly just plain wrong.
Nye Bevan, 'the NHS will exist for only as long as the people fight for it'...or something like that.

Offline Earl

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Re: Music which makes you cry (or almost)
« Reply #28 on: May 06, 2017, 10:35:34 PM »
Musette, do you do 'The Red Flag'?
Nye Bevan, 'the NHS will exist for only as long as the people fight for it'...or something like that.

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Re: Music which makes you cry (or almost)
« Reply #29 on: May 06, 2017, 10:39:03 PM »
I have no interest in singing anyway. 
Music isn't my hobby, it's my passion.